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Serama Standard and Tabletop Judging

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Parent Category: General Category: SCNA Articles

Traditional Serama Standard and Tabletop Judging

The Serama Standard is referred to when discussing Tabletop exhibition of Serama.  Tabletop exhibition is at the core of what the Serama is.  The Serama Standard and Tabletop Judging is similar only in appearance to the American Serama Standard.  The Serama Standard for Tabletop Judging removes all color and minimum weight restrictions with an increased focus on judging Character and Performance.  Tabletop demands more on Character and Performance than can be displayed with in-cage exhibition only.

The Serama Council of North America (SCNA) is the oldest, largest, and leading organization to promote the Serama and tabletop exhibition in North America.  The SCNA continues to encourage the breeding of Serama with type and character, as type and character define the breed in tabletop exhibition.

Serama Standard for Tabletop

Country of Origin: Malaysia & America

American Status: Fairly Common

Shape Of Male

Comb: Single, medium, set firmly and evenly on head, straight and upright, evenly serrated with five regular and distinct points, the middle points the same length as the width of the blade, moderately arched, blade should extend well over back of head.

Beak: Strong, stout, well curved.

Face: small, rounded, smooth, fine in texture, free from wrinkle or folds.

Eyes: Round, conspicuous.

Wattles: Medium, round, fine in texture, free from wrinkles or folds.

Ear Lobes: Small, oval, fitting closely to head.

Head: Small, carried well back in proud manner.

Neck: Medium length, backward arched showing off breast, full, tapering gracefully from shoulders to head.

Hackle: Abundant, flowing naturally from front of neck reaching far back covering both shoulders.

Back: short, broad, in profile, shaped like a V with neck and tail forming the vertical sides.

Tail Coverts & Saddle: Slightly curved, sword shaped hanging over the abdomen and covering back, widely spread, overlapping the tail and lesser sickles.

Tail:Moderately large and upright, carried in an upright position so as to almost contact the back of head.

Main Tail: Feathers wide, moderately spread in a neatly overlapping manner, rising above the head, 'A' shaped from the rear view.

Main Sickles: Medium to long, strong, firm, broad sword-shaped slightly curved.

Lesser Sickles: Well spread, medium length slightly upright, sword-shaped sickle feathers covered with coverts.

Coverts: Abundant, becoming very broad, flowing well up tail.

Wings: Large, long, closely folded, carried vertically not quite touching the ground, Shoulders and Fronts: Prominent, slightly concealed by hackle.

Bows: Well rounded.

Coverts: Feathers broad, forming two distinct bars across wings.

Primaries: Moderate width, rather long, completely concealed by secondaries.

Secondaries: Broad, tapering convexly to rear, wing bay well exposed.

Breast: Highly lifted, well developed, full, carried prominently forward beyond vertical line drawn from point of beak, broad and well rounded, from head to neck to breast 'S' shaped profile.

Body & Stern: Body- short, good depth and width, sloping from front to rear. Stern: Fluff, short, abundant.

Legs & Toes: Legs- average length, widely set, parallel to each other without bowing or knock knees, well proportioned.

Lower Thighs: Short, stout at top and tapering to hocks.

Shanks: Medium, smooth, round, evenly scaled.

Toes: Four, straight, well and evenly spread, evenly scaled.

Appearance: Small, broad, compact, active, tame, standing up majestically.

Shape Of Female

Comb: Single, small, set firmly and evenly on head, straight and upright, evenly serrated with five regular and distinct points, the middle points the same length as the width of the blade, moderately arched, blade should extend well over back of head.

Beak: Strong, stout, well curved.

Face: small, rounded, smooth, fine in texture, free from wrinkle or folds.

Eyes: Round, conspicuous.

Wattles: Small, round, fine in texture, free from wrinkles or folds.

Ear Lobes: Small, oval, fitting closely to head.

Head: Small, carried well back in proud manner.

Neck: Medium length, backward arched showing off breast, full, tapering gracefully from shoulders to head.

Hackle: Abundant, flowing naturally from front of neck reaching far back covering both shoulders.

Back: Short, broad, in profile, shaped like a V with neck and tail forming the vertical sides.

Cushion: Short, feathers broad and plentiful.

Tail: Moderately large and upright, carried in an upright position so as to almost contact the back of head.

Main Tail: Feathers wide, moderately spread in a neatly overlapping manner, rising above the head 'A' shaped from the rear view.

Coverts: Abundant, becoming very broad, flowing well up tail.

Wings: Large, long, closely folded, carried vertically not quite touching the ground, Shoulders and Fronts: Prominent, slightly concealed by hackle.

Bows: Well rounded.

Coverts: Feathers broad, forming two distinct bars across wings.

Primaries: Moderate width, rather long, completely concealed by secondaries.

Secondaries: Broad, tapering convexly to rear, wing bay well exposed.

Breast: Highly lifted, well developed, full, carried prominently forward beyond vertical line drawn from point of beak, broad and well rounded, from head to neck to breast 'S' shaped profile.

Body & Stern: Body- short, good depth and width, sloping from front to rear. Stern: Fluff, short, abundant.

Legs & Toes: Legs- average length, widely set, parallel to each other without bowing or knock knees, well proportioned.

Lower Thighs: Short, stout at top and tapering to hocks.

Shanks: Medium, smooth, round, evenly scaled.

Toes: Four, straight, well and evenly spread, evenly scaled.

Appearance: Small, broad, compact, active, tame, standing up majestically

Disqualifications

Comb: Comb foreign to the breed

Single comb falling below the horizontal plane on level with top of head.

Single comb with side sprig. Split comb.

Inverted Comb

Legs: Creeper Legs

Toes: Other than 4 toes

Tail: Wry Tail

Wings: Horizontal Wing

Any visible signs of illness or parasites; mites, lice, pale comb, etc

Defects

Comb: Thumb marks. Large combs

Wattles: Large wattles. Wattles with wrinkles or folds

Head: Narrow head, crow head

Back: Long or narrow back

Chest/Breast: Shallow or narrow breast

Legs: Short Legs


Color of Male and Female for Tabletop (TT) Judging

COMB, FACE, WATTLES, EAR LOBES, BEAK, EYES, SHANKS & TOES: No color requirement

PLUMAGE: No color requirement

Suggested Weight Divisions

Experience has shown that events over 250 entries will benefit by splitting entries into weight classifications. Here are the weight divisions if a show so chooses to do so:

Mature Cocks

Class A - up to 350 grams

Class B - up to 500 grams

Class C - up to 600 grams

Mature Hens

Class A - up to 325 grams

Class B - up to 425 grams

Class C - up to 525 grams

Cockerels

One Class Up To - 500 grams

Pullets

One Class Up To - 425 grams

Notice there is no lower weight limit on Class A Cocks/Hens, Cockerels, or Pullets.  This is only a suggestion for events with other 250 entries and not a requrement for Tabletop.  At all events regardless of entries, the maximum weight limit should follow the weight listed for Class C Cocks/Hens, Cockerels, and Pullets.

scorecard

JUDGING SERAMA GUIDELINES

Serama are judged in a Tabletop-judging format. The birds are individually judged and evaluated while standing free on a table in front of one or more judges. This sets the Serama apart from what most chicken breeders are used to since all other breeds are simply picked up then placed back into their cages. Therefore, the Serama must not only fit the standard in appearance but it must also have the correct behavior and be easy to handle.

SIZES

The size of Serama should not exceed the size limits for a given category. When a bird has been entered in a given category and it is found to weigh more than the standard weight for that category; that particular bird should bedisqualified from that category and moved into the proper category.Overweight birds may be disqualified at show manager’s discretion.

TEMPERAMENT AND TYPE

These are the two most important traits for any Serama intended for showing. These are the basis for what makes Serama a distinct and unique breed. Both of these factors are awarded the largest number of points in the point scale—thus, they should in no way be ignored.

1. TEMPERAMENT

Temperament is of the utmost importance in Serama. Temperament is based on both nature and nurture. The selection for calm and friendly temperament must be stressed in the breeding pen to heighten this important trait through each generation because genetics and inheritance play a very large role in the temperament of each generation. This is nature. In addition, young Serama should be brought to shows so that they become accustomed to the handling and crowds they will encounter at such shows in their later years. Therefore, it is very important to start handling and training your birds for show at as young an age as possible. This is nurture. Aggressive birds that attack the handler are highly discouraged and must not be used in the breeding pen. Wild, frightened birds that try to flee from the cage or the handler also should also be discouraged. Only friendly calm birds should be used for breeding or showing.

2. TYPE

Type is the essence of any breed. Without proper type, a bird is not recognizable as a member of a given breed. Type refers to the silhouette of the bird and is the general outline of the bird. In Serama, type also refers to the way the bird poses or its carriage. The proper type and carriage of Serama is for the body to be at a 90° angle from the ground. The balance should not be affected and with proper carriage it is not. The head carriage of the Serama is also very important to the type. The proper head carriage is for the head to be pulled back as far as possible, so that the back of the comb touches or nearly touches the main sickles and the eye is behind the leg when viewed from the side, that is if you were to draw an imaginary line from the front of the eye down to the leg. Thus, the breast will be held out at maximum extension. Neck carriage refers to the way the neck is held to allow for the head to be held fully back, the breast fully forward, but yet the wattles do not hang on or lay on the breast. To do this, the neck must have sufficient length. Breast fullness refers to the well-extended breast that is required to have proper type. The breast should be well muscled, held far forward, and yet high and not at all low to the ground.

BODY

It is vitally important to the breed that the Serama's body be full and well muscled, especially the breast. Thin birds, without full, solid breast muscling should be disqualified. The muscling of the bird is an indicator of vitality. Thin birds are of no use to the breed, as they are very susceptible to disease and are lacking in vitality and are generally of poor reproductive qualities.

TAIL

The tail must be well held, solidly set on the body. Poorly set tails are a points deduction, and wry tails must be disqualified . Low tails are to be discouraged. The very high angle of the tail is of great importance in creating the outline of the breed and is a major factor in the type of the Serama. True Main tail feathers - Thin and sparse main tail feathers are a detriment to the breed. Birds with less than five main tail feathers on each side should be given a points deduction. While five feathers on each side of the main tail is the fewest allowable, more than five on each side is preferred. Sickles - Again, thin or sparse sickles are undesirable. Straight sickles are not desirable. Secondary Sickles - Sparse, thin or poor textured secondary sickles are undesirable.Saddles - Sparse, broken or thin saddles are to be avoided.

 

WINGS

Wings that are held above the vertical line are undesirable. Birds with wings nearly horizontal should be disqualified. Wings should not drag along the ground to the point of damage or tattering . They should clear the ground just enough to be intact and well groomed. Wings that drag along the ground and are constantly dirty, tattered and broken are an unpleasant sight.

LEGS

Legs should be long enough to keep the wing just above the ground. Very short legs are often the result of the creeper gene, and this is very undesirable in Serama, as this is a Chabo (Japanese bantam) trait, and is also a lethal gene. Very short legs make for ragged, tattered wings that drag the ground. Very short legs are to be disqualified. Legs should be of medium length, but not long either. Further, more than four toes is also a disqualification.

FEATHERS

Thin, sparse, picked, broken, ruffled, partially frizzled or coarse, or rough feathering are undesirable. Only smooth, well-textured, medium tight feathers are allowable.

COMB/WATTLES

Combs should be small to medium to present an elegant and refined look. Wattles also should not be overly large. Long pendulous wattles, very large combs, or combs that flop over and combs or wattles with folds and thumb marks are to be strongly discouraged.

APPEARANCE

The condition of the bird is the essence of good rearing and show preparation. Bad looking birds that are dirty, with excessively broken, roughed or tattered featherswill receive a points deduction. Any bird showing an infestation of parasites,  symptoms of disease,  or other  physical problems should be disqualified and removed from the show.

CHARACTER AND PERFORMANCE

Tabletop demands more on Character and Performance than can be displayed with in-cage exhibition only.  Performance refers to the abiltiy of the bird to simply perform on the table.  Male perfomance attributes include (but not limited) strutting, wing flapping, crowing, and moving about the table.  Female performance attributes include (not limited) talking/clucking, scratching, and moving about the table.

Tier One -- Judging - Quality Awards

Each Serama in each class is individually evaluated and awarded a score up to 100.

Serama awarded a score of 95 - 100 earn a Purple Ribbon

Serama awarded a score of 90 - 94 earn a Blue Ribbon

Serama awarded a score of 85 -89 earn a Red Ribbon

Serama awarded a score of 80 -84 earn a White ribbon

Serama awarded a score of 75-79 earn a Yellow ribbon

Tier Two -- Judging …

The topscoring birds in each class compete against each other.

One is selected Class Champion, another is selected Class Reserve Champion

Classes consist of Cock, Hen, Cockerel, and Pullet as well as M/F Frizzled, Silkied, Malay, and Booted

In Stand-Alone Serama-Only-Shows, the Cock and Hen classes may be further divided by weight, A, B & C

Tier Three – Judging …

All Class Champions compete against each other.

One is selected Show Champion, another is selected Show Reserve Champion

In case of a tie, tier I scorecards are compared beginning with the first line "TYPE", and the higher score in that category wins, proceeding to the next category if necessary until a winner can be declared.

Sunday the 1st. The Definitive Voice of the Serama in North America
Copyright 2012

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By SCNA